Skip Navigation
Background Image
Original Smaller

PRECIPITATION MEASUREMENT MISSIONS

Mission Status

The GPM Core Observatory successfully launched from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, on February 27th, 2014 at 1:37pm EST. It is currently in orbit and undergoing initial instrument checkout and testing procedures.

Mission Updates

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally. Calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) continued.
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally. On April 2, the GPM Core Observatory fired its thrusters for an 80-second delta-V burn that accelerated the spacecraft and circularized its orbit. The Core Observatory is now flying in its final orbit, 253 miles (407 kilometers) above Earth's surface. Calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) continued. On March 30 and 31, additional DPR external...
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory commissioning activities continued normally this week. Both the GPM Microwave Imager and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) are collecting science data and NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency released the first images from the instruments on March 25. The DPR's functional checkout activities and internal calibration continued. The first external calibration using the Active Radar Calibration site...
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally. Both the GPM Microwave Imager and Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar are collecting science data. Functional checkout activities and internal calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar continued. On March 17, the team executed GPM's first scheduled yaw turn to turn the orientation of the spacecraft 180 degrees. Yaw is the left/right orientation in the horizontal plane of the...
On March 12, the GPM Core Observatory fired its thrusters for a 30-second check-out of their performance. The burn, called a delta-v, changes the velocity of the spacecraft to adjust the altitude of its orbit. This week's short maneuver did not greatly alter the satellite's orbit but was used instead for further calibration of the thrusters. Functional checkout activities and internal calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar continued this week. Both DPR and the GPM...
On Saturday, March 8, just after 10 a.m. EST, the second of the two science instruments aboard the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory was activated, and the teams in the mission operations center and launch support room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., began the instrument's checkout period. DPR functional checkout activities and internal calibrations continued on Sunday and will continue this week and next. DPR...
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission Core Observatory is performing normally. The initial checkout of the GMI instrument and the spacecraft showed both are performing as expected, and the GMI instrument continues to collect science data on rain and snowfall.
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission Core Observatory is performing normally. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) continues in science mode, and GMI data is being sent to the Precipitation Processing System (PPS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Using the initial data, the instrument team has verified that GMI is working well on-orbit.   The GPM Core Observatory will have a 60 day on-orbit check out period to ensure the healthy operation of the...
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission Core Observatory is performing normally. Today, the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument started to spin at its normal rate and collect science data on rain and snowfall. The GMI instrument is a multi-channel microwave radiometer that uses 13 channels to measure the intensity of the microwave energy emitted from Earth's surface and atmosphere. GMI will detect total precipitation within all layers of clouds, including snow and ice, and rain from...
Today, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission Core Observatory successfully fired its thrusters for five seconds to check out the thruster performance. This type of maneuver, called a delta-V, changes the velocity of the spacecraft to adjust the altitude of its orbit. Today's delta-V resulted in only a very slight change in the orbit, but will help the GPM team assess and calibrate the thruster performance. By contrast, yesterday the team pulsed each maneuvering thruster 3-6 times,...