Extreme Weather News

GPM Sees Bonnie as a Tropical Depression Again

GPM Sees Bonnie as a Tropical Depression Again

Tropical storm Bonnie weakened to a tropical depression on May 29, 2016. The circulation was labeled as "Post-Tropical" and has been moving very slowly to the northeast near the Carolinas coastline. Bonnie developed organized convection near the center and the system has again been labeled a tropical depression.
The GPM core observatory satellite saw Tropical Depression Bonnie on June 1, 2016 at 2226 UTC (6:26 PM EDT). GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments measured precipitation in a few powerful convective thunderstorms falling at a rate of almost 124 mm (4.9 inches) per hour. Storm top heights of over 15km (9.3 miles) were found by GPM's Radar (Ku Band).

GPM Sees Bonnie as a Tropical Depression Again

Bonnie is moving over the warm waters of the Gulf Stream so the National Hurricane Center (NHC) predicts that the tropical depression will strengthen for a short time. By June 4, 2016 increased vertical shear and colder sea surface temperatures are expected to cause Bonnie to again weaken to post-tropical remnants.

GPM is a joint missions between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

  • Images and caption by Hal Pierce (SSAI/NASA GSFC)