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Your search for "Water vapor" gave back 31 results.
Screenshot from water vapor animation
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Water vapor - and with it energy - is carried around the globe by weather systems. This satellite image shows the distribution of water vapor over Africa and the Atlantic Ocean.
The Water Cycle: Steaming the Air
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Explore water vapor in the air in part two of the water cycle series. This second part of our series on the water cycle illustrates the way in which evaporation and winds combine to move water from the ocean to the land.
The Water Cycle: Watering the Land
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Explore how water droplets form and fall from the sky in part three of the water cycle series. Watch how water vapor moves through the atmosphere and returns to Earth as rain and snow.
Components of the water cycle thumb.
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The process by which water moves around the earth, from the ocean, to the atmosphere, to the land and back to the ocean is called the water cycle. These animations each portray a component of the water cycle.
View of the Pacific Ocean from Space
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Water is a vital substance that sets the Earth apart from the rest of the planets in our solar system. In particular, water appears to be a necessary ingredient for the development and nourishment of life.
Diagram of the water cycle from NASA Earth Science
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This article explains the basics behind the water cycle and includes many good visuals. It provides some good background information about our water cycle as well as providing students with many real-world applications.

Is rain formed by the condensation of water vapor or by the melting of ice?

This important question is still under investigation. Much of the rain is produced by clouds whose tops do not extend to temperatures colder than 0° C. The mechanism responsible for rain formation in these "warm" clouds is merging or "coalescence" among cloud droplets, which are first formed by vapor condensation. Coalescence is probably the dominant rain-forming mechanism in the tropics. It is also effective in some mid-latitude clouds whose tops may extend to subfreezing temperatures. However, once a cloud extends to altitudes where the temperature is colder than 0° C, ice crystals can form and "ice-phase" processes become important. In favorable conditions, ice-involving processes can initiate precipitation in half the amount of time water-only processes would need. Hence, at mid-latitudes, cumulus cloud rain is probably initiated by ice-processes and melting of ice. Observations have shown, however, that precipitation can first appear at levels warmer that 0° C, where vapor condensation and coalescence are the main rain producers. Thus, precipitation may be initiated by either process.

Components of the Water Cycle on a Flat Map
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The process by which water moves around the earth, from the ocean, to the atmosphere, to the land and back to the ocean is called the water cycle. These animations each portray a component of the water cycle.
The Water Cycle: Following the Water
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Explore how water moves across land and returns to the ocean in the final installment of the water cycle series. The visualizations illustrate the movement of water on land—from storage of precipitation in soil layers, to its transport via rivers.
Screenshot from water cycle movie
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This animation uses Earth science data from a variety of sensors on NASA Earth observing satellites as well as cartoons to describe Earth's water cycle and the continuous movement of water on, above and below the surface of the Earth.

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