Typhoons

Typhoon Koppu's Deadly Philippine Rainfall

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Typhoon Koppu's Deadly Philippine Rainfall

Extremely heavy rainfall from super typhoon Koppu has caused deadly flooding and mudslides in the Philippines. Koppu hit the eastern coast of Luzon as a category four super typhoon with winds of 130kts (150 mph). Koppu weakened but was still battering the Philippines as a typhoon after reaching the Lingayen Gulf on Luzon's western coast. Typhoon Koppu then made a turn toward the north and continued to drench the northern Philippines as it followed Luzon's northwestern coast. Torrents of rain flowing from mountainous terrain magnified the effects of very high rainfall totals.

Powerful Typhoon Goni Brushing The Philippines

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Powerful Typhoon Goni Brushing The Philippines

Rain bands from typhoon Goni were hitting the island of Luzon in the northern Philippines when the GPM core observatory satellite flew over on August 20, 2015 at 0711 UTC (3:11 PM Philippine Standard Time). GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) clearly showed the intensity of rain falling in Goni's inner and replacement outer eye wall. GMI found that precipitation was falling at a rate of over 88.0 (3.5 inches) in extreme rainfall south of Goni's distinct eye.

Intensifying Atsani Viewed By GPM

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Intensifying Atsani Viewed By GPM

Atsani is a typhoon today but was an intensifying tropical storm moving over the open waters of the Pacific Ocean on August 16, 2015 when the GPM core observatory satellite flew above at 0601 UTC. An analysis of precipitation derived from GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments is shown overlaid on a 0600 UTC MTSAT-2 visible infrared image. This analysis revealed that very heavy rain that was located south of the storm's center of circulation.

Deadly Typhoon Soudelor's Rainfall Analyzed

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Deadly Typhoon Soudelor's Rainfall Analyzed

Soudelor formed in the middle of the Pacific Ocean well east of Guam on July 20, 2015. Soudelor became more powerful with peak intensity of about 155 kts (178 mph) reached on August 3, 2015 when the super typhoon was well east of Taiwan over the open waters of the Pacific Ocean. Soudelor's winds died down a little but rebounded to with over 100 kts (115 mph) before hitting Taiwan . Although Soudler was still a powerful typhoon when it hit land most deaths and destruction were caused by flooding and mudslides from heavy rainfall not from strong winds.

GPM Sees Typhoon Soudelor On Taiwan's Doorstep

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GPM Sees Typhoon Soudelor On Taiwan's Doorstep

The GPM core observatory satellite continued to provide excellent coverage of Soudelor as the typhoon closed in on Taiwan. GPM flew directly above typhoon Soudelor's eye on August 7, 2015 at 1041Z (6:41 PM Local Time) when wind speeds were 110 kts (127 mph). Rainfall data from GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments revealed very heavy rainfall in spiraling bands rotating around a decaying inner eye wall.

GPM Has Another Good Look At Soudelor

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Typhoon Soudelor's winds had dropped to 95 kts ( 109 mph) when the GPM core observatory satellite had another excellent daytime view on August 6, 2015 at 0006 UTC. GPM's Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) data showed that Soudelor had heavy rainfall in an inner eye wall and also in a much larger replacement outer eye wall. The heaviest rain found by GPM was dropping at a rate of close to 70 mm (2.4 inches) per hour in a strong feeder band spiraling in on the southwestern side of the typhoon.

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