tropical cyclones

TRMM Mission Comes to an End

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In 1997 when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, or TRMM, was launched, its mission was scheduled to last just a few years. Now, 17 years later, the TRMM mission has come to an end. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) stopped TRMM’s science operations and data collection on April 8 after the spacecraft depleted its fuel reserves.

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TRMM Comes to an End after 17 Years

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In 1997 when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, or TRMM, was launched, its mission was scheduled to last just a few years. Now, 17 years later, the TRMM mission has come to an end. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) stopped TRMM’s science operations and data collection on April 8 after the spacecraft depleted its fuel reserves.

Cyclone Ikola

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Cyclone Ikola

Cyclone Ikola

The TRMM satellite's Microwave Imager (TMI) instrument collected data used in this rainfall analysis when the satellite flew over tropical storm Ikola in the South Indian Ocean on April 5, 2015 at 1722 UTC. TMI data revealed the location of rain falling at a rate of over 50 mm (amost 2 inches) per hour around Ikola's eye. 

GPM's Worldwide Tour of Global Precipitation

GPM's Worldwide Tour of Global Precipitation

Rain, snow, hail, ice, and every mix in between make up the precipitation that touches everyone on our planet. But precipitation doesn't fall equally in all places around the world, as seen in NASA's new animation that captures every shower, snowstorm and tropical cyclone over a six-day period in August 2014. The time lapse was created from data captured by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite mission,  now just over a year old, which scientists are using to better understand freshwater resources, natural disasters, crop health and more.

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