launch

Handover of GPM Key

Handover of GPM Key
Image Caption: 
On May 29, GPM Deputy Project Manager Candace Carlisle (left) handed over the "key" to the GPM Core Observatory to GPM Mission Director James Pawloski (center, blue shirt).

Also pictured, left to right, Wynn Watson, Art Azarbarzin, Gail Skofronick-Jackson and David Ward.
 

Daruma Doll Delivery

Daruma Doll Delivery
Image Caption: 
In the Mission Operations Center on May 16, 2014, GPM's NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency project managers deliver the completed Daruma doll to the members of the Flight Operations team that completed the spacecraft's check-out.

Coloring in the Daruma Doll Eye

Coloring in the Duruma Doll Eye
Image Caption: 
On May 16, 2014, GPM project managers Art Azarbarzin (left, NASA) and Masahiro Kojima (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) color in the second eye of a Daruma doll, a Japanese tradition for reaching goals.

This signifies the successful completion of on-orbit check out of the GPM Core Observatory.

GPM Launches from Tanegashima Space Center

GPM Launches from Tanegashima Space Center
Image Caption: 
GPM Launches from Tanegashima Space Center

A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, is seen launching from the Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. The GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

GPM Launches from Tanegashima Space Center

Video Embed: 

A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, is seen launching from the Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center. The GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours.

GPM Liftoff

GPM Liftoff
Image Caption: 
GPM Liftoff
A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, is seen launching from the Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. The GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

GPM Power Positive

The GPM Core Observatory has successfully deployed its solar arrays and is stable and pointed at the sun.

GPM’s solar arrays are pointed at the sun and collecting power. We have confirmation that the arrays are rotating properly, charging the batteries and providing power to the spacecraft.

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