Two Decades of IMERG: Resources

NASA Announces Long-term IMERG Satellite Record: A Near-Global 19-year Perspective on Rain and Snow

Latest IMERG global imagery

NASA has just released its newest estimate of rain and snow covering the past 19 years.  It's code name: Version 6 IMERG. NASA's IMERG -- the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) -- combines information from whatever constellation of satellties are operating in Earth orbit, at a given time, to estimate precipitation over the majority of the Earth's surface.  This algorithm is particularly valuable over the majority of the Earth's surface that lacks precipitation-measuring instruments on the ground.  What is new in Version 6 IMERG is that the algorithm can now fuse the early precipititation estimates collected in 2000-2014 during the operation of the TRMM satellite with more recent precipitation estimates collected during operation of the GPM satellite.  The longer the record, the more valuable it is, as researchers and application developers will attest. TRMM and GPM are two satellites specially designed to provide the most reliable space-based estimates of preciptiation, and both satellites are joint missions between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).  More information about these satellite is provided below, along with the potential applications of the IMERG data set to which they contribute.  The final fronteer is Earth's polar regions, as research continues on how to enable a future version of IMERG to estimate snow falling over ice-covered regions such as Antarctica.

To highlight the release of this version of IMERG, a range of resources are provided below to describe how V06 IMERG will help with research and applications from understanding precipitation anomalies throughout the globe to understanding how end users will use this data to make decisions that will benefit society.

 

IMERG Videos


NASA has just released its newest and most comprehensive estimate of rain and snow covering nearly 20 years. Version 6 of NASA's IMERG -- the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) -- combines information from a constellation of satellites are operating in Earth orbit, at a given time, to estimate precipitation over the majority of the Earth's surface. This algorithm is particularly valuable over the majority of the Earth's surface that lacks precipitation-measuring instruments on the ground. What is new in Version 6 IMERG is that the algorithm can now fuse the early precipitation estimates collected in 2000-2014 during the operation of the TRMM satellite with more recent precipitation estimates collected during operation of the GPM satellite. The longer the record, the more valuable it is, as researchers and application developers will attest. TRMM and GPM are two satellites specially designed to provide the most reliable space-based estimates of precipitation, and both satellites are joint missions between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). 

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13345

The most detailed view of our daily weather has been created using NASA's newest extended precipitation record known as the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM, or IMERG analysis. The IMERG analysis combines almost 20 years of rain and snow data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the joint NASA-JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM). The daily cycle of weather, also known as the diurnal cycle, shapes how and when our weather develops and is fundamental to regulating our climate.

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13348

 

IMERG Articles 

Two Decades of Rain, Snowfall from NASA’s Precipitation Missions

When the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission launched in 2014, it continued the data record of its predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Together with their partner satellites in the Precipitation Measurement Mission (PMM) constellation, GPM and TRMM have created a 19-year data record of daily global precipitation, giving scientists an unprecedented look at events ranging from daily patterns, to disasters, to long-term trends over large areas.

Read the full article 


Using the IMERG Long-term Precipitation Data for Applications

A long precipitation data set like the new GPM IMERG V06 product is valuable for many applications and for decision-making. Accurate and reliable precipitation records are not only crucial to understanding trends and variability but also for water management resources and food security, ecological management, and weather, climate and hydrological forecasting. Here we present a few highlights showcasing how GPM IMERG is helping a variety of end users make decisions that will benefit society for years to come.

Read the full article 

 

Interactive Precipitation Resources

Data Tutorials using IMERG from the NASA GES DISC

Introductory Webinar: Overview and Applications of Integrated Multi-Satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) Long-term Precipitation Data Products

On October 16, 2019, GPM held a webinar about the new Version 6 release of the IMERG multi-satellite precipitation-estimation algorithm.  This training is for professionals interested in using a state-of-the-art precipitation data product for applications in the water resources, disasters, agriculture, energy, and health sectors.  By the end of the training, participates will:

  • Be familiar with the TRMM/GPM Missions, GPM data products, and GPM Applications
  • Understand IMERG and the strengths/caveats of the long-term IMERG data record
  • Find previous training webinars related to GPM precipitation
  • Learn to access, analyze, and visualize IMERG data using NASA web-tools

Training Resources

 

Freshwater Availability Toolkit

Find data, tools, tutorials, and articles about a variety of topics related to freshwater availability, including rain, snow and ice, rivers and lakes, groundwater, soil moisture, and water quality: https://earthdata.nasa.gov/learn/toolkits/freshwater-availability

From Satellites to Your Backyard - Graphing IMERG Monthly Precipitation Data

Did you know that NASA has satellites that are able to observe rain and snow all over the world? By following some easy directions, you can access NASA data to see how much precipitation was observed by satellites for your location any time from June 2000 to the present time: https://pmm.nasa.gov/education/interactive/from-satellites-to-your-backyard-using-imerg

GPM Webinar Training: Introductory Webinar: Overview and Applications of Integrated Multi-Satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) Long-term Precipitation Data Products

GPM conducted two webinar sessions on October 15 to provide an overview and applications of IMERG V06. IMERG V06 is the latest upgrade to the GPM IMERG data product which provides a ~20 year data record of global precipitation. To view more information about the webinar including objectives, registration, agenda or the webinar recording (after Oct. 15), please go to:  https://pmm.nasa.gov/meetings/all/gpm-applications-webinar-imerg-v6

NASA GSFC Sunday Experiment: NASA’s Tour of the Electromagnetic Spectrum and GPM’s IMERG Fall Campaign - Oct. 20, 1 – 3 p.m.

Sunday Experiment is a free monthly program offered at the Goddard Visitor Center. 
Take a tour across the spectrum and explore a world beyond the visible. Discover how NASA instruments can “see” the invisible and observe our planet, from measuring the amount of rain in a storm cloud to detecting healthy vegetation. From animations to graphs, there are a variety of ways scientists can visualize satellite data. Join us to learn how satellite instruments make passive and active measurements and how these data are visualized.

This is also a special month for one of the most important missions that was ever built at Goddard – the Global Precipitation Measurement mission. We are celebrating two decades of global precipitation measurements and how we can use invisible light to help us observe the amount of precipitation that is falling from the clouds onto our “water planet.” Come hear why this is such an exciting time to study precipitation, and find out how these data are being used to help us prepare for such extreme events as hurricanes and floods.” To learn more about this and other Sunday Experiment events please visit: https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard-visitor-center-events-and-programs


 

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