Mission Status

March 2015

The GPM Core Observatory successfully launched from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, on February 27th, 2014 at 1:37pm EST. It is currently in orbit, and data from the mission is available for the public to download from a variety of sources and formats which are outlined on the PMM Data Access page.

Mission Updates

The NOAA network is gradually being restored.  MHS data appears to have started flowing around 02:00 UTC on 23 October 2014, but as of 08:00 UTC on 23 October 2014 the Meteosat geo-IR data was still  missing.  As a result, users should see reduced areas of "missing" and higher-quality estimates in general starting with the 03:00 UTC 23 October 2014 3B42RT.  
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Starting about 22:00 UTC on 20 October 2014 PPS started having issues with missing input data files originating at NOAA. Informally we have been told that there is a major network issue, but have no insight on its nature or likely duration. Until this is resolved, the input data for the 3B4xRT suite of products will suffer greatly reduced volume.  Currently, we are not receiving sounder data, and the IR fields only have GOES-E and -W. 
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The TRMM satellite is descending, and the users of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data should be aware that the last production orbit of public PR data was orbit #96230 from October 7th, 2014. From that point forward, the TRMM PR data is suspended because no useful cloud data are being observed. It is possible that PR data will again be made available when TRMM descends to the vicinity of its at-launch altitude of 350 km. TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data will continue to be produced and publicly...
The most accurate and comprehensive collection of rain, snowfall and other types of precipitation data ever assembled now is available to the public. This new resource for climate studies, weather forecasting, and other applications is based on observations by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, a joint mission of NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with contributions from a constellation of international partner satellites.
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Since December 1997, TRMM and the instruments it carries have provided valuable information to researchers, the applications community, and the public. On July 8, 2014, pressure readings from the fuel tank indicated that TRMM is at the end of its fuel. As a result, NASA has ceased station keeping maneuvers and TRMM has begun its drift downward from its operating altitude of 402 km. A small amount of fuel has been retained to conduct debris avoidance maneuvers to ensure the satellite remains...
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The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Precipitation Processing System at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, has released the Level 2 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) data to the public. The data set includes precipitation rates, which show how much rain and snowfall accumulate over a given time period.
The GPM Core Observatory satellite was successfully launched on February 27th, 2014. Data from the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) have the following release schedule. All data are freely available through the NASA's Precipitation Processing System at http://pps.gsfc.nasa.gov
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The first set of data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission is now available to the public. The data set consists of GPM Microwave Imager instrument observations, called brightness temperatures. Brightness temperatures are a measurement of naturally occurring energy radiated, in this case, by precipitation particles like raindrops or snowflakes. Other data sets, like the rain rate information, will be released later this summer. By themselves, however, the brightness...
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The GPM spacecraft continues to perform normally. The GPM Microwave Imager and Dual-frequency Precipitation radar continue operations and calibration. The spacecraft performed two routine maneuvers. The first was a 180-degree yaw (left/right in the horizontal plane) turn. This is the second yaw turn that changes the orientation of the spacecraft; it is now flying forwards again. Yaw turns are performed approximately every 40 days for thermal control, as the angle between the spacecraft's...
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally. Calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) continued.

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